Tag Archives: Ananapanasati

A discourse on Anapanasati Meditation

buddhadasa-bhikkhu

Ven. Buddhadàsa Bhikkhu

In 2016, The Meditation Circle has been focusing on the Buddhist meditation known as Anàpànasati (the development of mindfulness of breathing)  To learn more about this meditation technique, we encourage you to download this .pdf of a teaching on Anàpànasati by Buddhadasa Bhikkhu.

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As the introduction to this document notes:

Originally published in Thai, this manual is one of the major works of the Ven. Buddhadàsa Bhikkhu and delivered in 1959 in the form of a series of lectures to monks of Suanmokkha Monastery, Chaiya, Thailand.

Ven. Buddhadàsa Bhikkhu, a major voice in the Buddhist world, is an accepted master of Buddhist meditation. In constructive positive language, the manual guides the meditator through the 16 steps of ânàpànasati. Every difficulty that the meditator is liable to face as well as the benefits of practice is examined at length. All that remains is for the aspirant to the noble path to get on with the job.

Taking it breath by breath in 2016

buddhadraped

In 2016, the Meditation Circle will be focusing on anapanasati, a core meditation practice in the Buddha’s teaching, focusing on the inhalation and exhalation of the breath and the 16 steps or instructions involved with deeply investigating the breath. This was one of the chief methods of meditation the Buddha likely practiced and taught throughout his 40 years of teaching. The 16 steps are divided into four sections or ‘tetrads.’

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First Tetrad:
1.
Breathing in a long breath, one knows one is breathing in a long breath.
Breathing out a long breath, one knows one is breathing out a long breath.
2.
Breathing in a short breath, one knows one is breathing in a short breath.
Breathing out a short breath, one knows one is breathing out a short breath.
3.
Breathing in, one experiences the whole body.
Breathing out, one experiences the whole body.
4.
Breathing in, one relaxes the bodily formations.
Breathing out, one relaxes the bodily formations.
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Second Tetrad:
5.
Breathing in, one experiences joy (or enjoyment).
Breathing out, one experiences joy (or enjoyment).
6.
Breathing in, one experiences pleasure (or well-being).
Breathing out, one experiences pleasure (or well-being).
7.
Breathing in, one experiences one’s mental formations.
Breathing out, one experiences one’s mental formations.
8.
Breathing in, one relaxes one’s mental formations.
Breathing out, one relaxes one’s mental formations.
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Third Tetrad
9.
Breathing in, one experiences the mind.
Breathing out, one experiences the mind.
10.
Breathing in, one has satisfaction of mind.
Breathing out, one has satisfaction of mind.
11.
Breathing in, one composes the mind.
Breathing out, one composes the mind.
12.
Breathing in, one liberates the mind.
Breathing out, one liberates the mind.
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Fourth Tetrad:
13.
Breathing in, one contemplates impermanence.
Breathing out, one contemplates impermanence.
14.
Breathing in, one contemplates fading away (of clinging).
Breathing out, one contemplates fading away (of clinging).
15.
Breathing in, one contemplates cessation (of clinging).
Breathing out, one contemplates cessation (of clinging).
16.
Breathing in, one contemplates relinquishment.
Breathing out, one contemplates relinquishment.

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If you wish to explore on your own the teachings on  anapanasati, here are some suggestions:

  1. The Anapanasati Sutta: Mindfulness of Breathing. This is the sutta (Pali– ‘sutra’ in Sanskrit) in which the Buddha lays out his guidance on practicing this kind of meditation.
  2. Larry Rosenberg talks. Lay Buddhist teacher Larry Rosenberg (author of “Breath by Breath: The Liberating Practice of Insight Meditation“) says of his teaching approach: “The method I use most in teaching is anapanasati or mindfulness with breathing. Breath awareness supports us while we investigate the entire mind-body process. It helps calm the mind and gives us a graceful entry into a state of choiceless awareness–a place without agendas, where we are not for or against whatever turns up in the moment.” Here is a link to a page of audio files of his teachings at DharmaSeed.org. Click on the white bar that says ‘Select from Larry Rosenberg’s 308 Talks’ and find a host of them on anapanasati.
  3. Gil Fronsdal: Fronsdal is a leading lay Buddhist teacher and you can find his teachings on anapanasati practice at this link at AudioDharma.org.

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Come join the circle! Beginners are always welcome or those who are renewing a meditation practice. You don’t need to self-identify as a Buddhist  to gain the benefits of a regular meditation practice. The Meditation Circle meets every Tuesday from 6 to 7 p.m. at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation building, 520 Kanawha Blvd W, in Charleston, W.Va. For directions, click here.